California Chess History

California Chess Notables

by Kerry Lawless



ChessDryadThese inductees into the California Chess Notables have been noted because (in my opinion) they have been of service to California chess or were special in some way. Corrections to posted material are gladly accepted.






SAMUEL BEAN (1896-1952): When he was thirteen, an accident destroyed his optic and auditory nerves. Despite this handicap, he became a chess expert who won club and county championships. He also played in the North vs. South matches. Naturally he used a specially constructed board so that he could feel the pieces. Since he had to play slowly, his opponent usually set up another board for his own use while Sam was busy wandering all over his own board. Sam won most of his games and was quick to congratulate anyone who defeated him. He won the Berkeley Chess Club of the Deaf Championship eight times.

LA VIEVE HINES (1896-1997): She learned to play chess as a young girl. In 1918, she moved with her mother to Pasadena; supporting herself with occasional modeling jobs while playing violin for the Pasadena Symphony. According to chess historian, Bruce Monson, she was probably a strong class A player. She was the first strong California Woman player and regularly played at both the Pasadena and Los Angeles Chess Clubs; winning tournaments and giving simultaneous exhibitions. She won the double-round First American Women's Chess Congress in the Pasadena 1932 International Tournament by a score of 7-0. She was unofficially ackowledged as the 'Pacific Coast Women's Champion'. World Champion Alexander Alekhine thought she was the best female player in the country. Unfortunately, there was no United States Women's Championship yet.

WALTER KORN (1908-1997): A lifelong passion for chess coupled with great writing talent helped him produce a number of classic chess books, including, The Brilliant Touch in Chess, America's Chess Heritage, and The Art of Chess Competition. He was a contributing editor to Chess Life, British Chess Magazine, and Encyclopedia Britannica to name a few. Of course, he'll best be remembered as the editor of Modern Chess Openings (MCO), the "chess bible", from the 7th through the 12th editions. He moved to California in the mid-1970's and settled down in San Mateo, and I still remember the numerous times he came to 'Games of Berkeley'. He was always impeccably dressed, in suit and tie, as he pointed out the best spots to display MCO. He was a gentleman of the old school, in the very best sense.

EMIL LADNER (1912-1992): Deaf since the age of four, he started playing chess when he was ten and never lost his youthful love of the game. At one time or another, he played in team matches for the Oakland Chess Club and the Berkeley Chess club. Once, he won the Berkeley Chess Club Championship. He was a long time member of the Berkeley Chess Club of the Deaf and won its championship four times. He also won the California Association of the Deaf Chess Championship ten times. Besides being the Chess Editor of "Checkmate" in The Deaf American (formerly The Silent Worker), he co-author the book Silent Knights of the Chessboard.

MIKE PADOVANI (1933 - present): He started playing chess in 1973 at the age of 39 and became an Expert in 1981. In 1983, he donated two dozen chess sets and a dozen chess clocks to the newly re-organized Hayward Chess Club. In 1991, he bought Richard Shorman's first computer (a 386, 16mhz, 30 lb. luggable), used for teaching chess. He was also a large donor to Elizabeth Shaughnessy's "Chess in the Schools" program..

JOHN ALAN GREFE (1947-2013): Only a San Francisco Bay Area Senior Master without a FIDE title, he tied for first in the 1973 United States Championship. As usual, he was sitting in the lotus position throughout the tournament. He was awarded the FIDE International Master title in 1975. Even though more than one International Master acknowledged that John had more than enough talent to become a Grandmaster, he chose the Path of Enlightenment instead.

KERRY LAWLESS (1949-present): Soon after I began playing, I started organizing chess clubs. I organized and directed the Chabot Chess Club and Team (Hayward) from 1968-1970; organized and directed the USS Enterprise Chess Club (aircraft carrier based in San Diego) from 1971-1972; directed the San Leandro Chess Club in 1977; organized and directed the Captain Anchovy Chess Club and Team (San Leandro) from 1977-78; organized and directed the by-invitation-only Klamath Court Chess Club and Team (Hayward) from 1979-1980; directed the El Continental Chess Club and Team (Hayward) from 1981-1982; re-organized the Hayward Chess Club in 1983 and directed it from 1985-1996. During this period, I became a National Master (1981) and a Club Director. I worked at Games of Berkeley from 1987-1996, where I was in charge of ordering chess books. As the in-house chess expert, I also sold chess equipment at local tournaments. In 1992, Richard Shorman and I created the CalGames (later renamed CalBase) database, devoted to the preservation of California chess games. In 2000, I started ChessDryad.com.

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